inkmaggot:

koyamapress:

lineworknw:

We are proud to officially announce our lineup for Linework 2014! 
Art by Special Guest Michael DeForge.
Exhibitors:
2D Cloud
Alternative Comics
Bridge City Publishing
Crawdads Welcome
Lori D.
Farel Dalrymple
Dark Horse Comics
Barry Deutsch
Julie Dillon
Fantagraphics Books
Fantom Forest
Madéleine Flores
Foxing Quarterly
Grass Hut
Gridlords
Grimoire Press
Julia Gfrörer
Trillian Gunn
Hambrgr House
Hidden Fortress Press
Jonathan Hill
Meg Hunt
I Will Destroy You
Kinoko
Knotpile
Know Your City
Koyama Press
Kim Ku
Sloane Leong
The Little Friends of Printmaking
Most Ancient
Dylan Meconis
Magnetic North
Oni Press
Pigeon Soup Press
Plain Comics
PNCA Illustration
Pony Club Gallery
Pork Magazine 
Press Gang
Profanity Hill
Revival House
Yumi Sakugawa
Sardine Can Press
Snakebomb Comix
Sparkplug Comic Books
Studio JFish
Sturgill Studio
Teenage Dinosaur
Top Shelf Productions
Traditional Comics
Tugboat Press
Charmaine Verhagen
Pam Wishbow
Wuvable Oaf Comics
Yam Books
Whew! And we even have a couple of surprises left up our sleeves… Stay tuned for late-breaking additions, interviews with our exhibitors, and much more. Winnowing down to this final list was very difficult, and we had to leave lots of creators off that we would have loved to host at the show, but in the end we can’t believe what an amazing array of illustrators, cartoonists, and publishers have chosen to exhibit with us our first year! Thank you!

Koyama Press is excited to be part of the first Linework NW show!

Wow, great lineup. Someone please go as my surrogate.

inkmaggot:

koyamapress:

lineworknw:

We are proud to officially announce our lineup for Linework 2014

Art by Special Guest Michael DeForge.

Exhibitors:

2D Cloud

Alternative Comics

Bridge City Publishing

Crawdads Welcome

Lori D.

Farel Dalrymple

Dark Horse Comics

Barry Deutsch

Julie Dillon

Fantagraphics Books

Fantom Forest

Madéleine Flores

Foxing Quarterly

Grass Hut

Gridlords

Grimoire Press

Julia Gfrörer

Trillian Gunn

Hambrgr House

Hidden Fortress Press

Jonathan Hill

Meg Hunt

I Will Destroy You

Kinoko

Knotpile

Know Your City

Koyama Press

Kim Ku

Sloane Leong

The Little Friends of Printmaking

Most Ancient

Dylan Meconis

Magnetic North

Oni Press

Pigeon Soup Press

Plain Comics

PNCA Illustration

Pony Club Gallery

Pork Magazine 

Press Gang

Profanity Hill

Revival House

Yumi Sakugawa

Sardine Can Press

Snakebomb Comix

Sparkplug Comic Books

Studio JFish

Sturgill Studio

Teenage Dinosaur

Top Shelf Productions

Traditional Comics

Tugboat Press

Charmaine Verhagen

Pam Wishbow

Wuvable Oaf Comics

Yam Books

Whew! And we even have a couple of surprises left up our sleeves… Stay tuned for late-breaking additions, interviews with our exhibitors, and much more. Winnowing down to this final list was very difficult, and we had to leave lots of creators off that we would have loved to host at the show, but in the end we can’t believe what an amazing array of illustrators, cartoonists, and publishers have chosen to exhibit with us our first year! Thank you!

Koyama Press is excited to be part of the first Linework NW show!

Wow, great lineup. Someone please go as my surrogate.


fuckyoulizprince:

This Valentine’s Day, serenade your cats with the perfect love song from the Mr. T Experience catalogue.  Win extra points by buying your cats a copy of Alone Forever: The Singles Collection, in stores now from Top Shelf Productions!

fuckyoulizprince:

This Valentine’s Day, serenade your cats with the perfect love song from the Mr. T Experience catalogue.  Win extra points by buying your cats a copy of Alone Forever: The Singles Collection, in stores now from Top Shelf Productions!


superqueerartsyblog:

Comic about slurs, published in the Galago magazine last summer. 

(via superqueerartsyblog)


thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This semester we’ll be filling up a series of composition notebooks with all sorts of things. What sorts of things? Gary Panter has some ideas. 

Via "Unbored" 
GARY PANTER on sketchbooks…
Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.
You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.
You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.
TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.
2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.
4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.
5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.
7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.
9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.
Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This semester we’ll be filling up a series of composition notebooks with all sorts of things. What sorts of things? Gary Panter has some ideas.

Via "Unbored" 

GARY PANTER on sketchbooks…

Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.

You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.

You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.

2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.

4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.

5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.

7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.

9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.

Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention


comixwarriors:

Comix Warriors Week #20:  Make a Comic from a Random Book Page
Submissions open from 02/12/14 - 02/18/14, due at 11:59pm EST. Not sure of the time? Check the countdown timer on the blog’s main page!
A challenge emerges! DUN DUN DUNNNN This week, you’re asked to grab a random book, turn to a random page, and make a comic out of it! You can choose another random page if the first one is just a total bore or is unsuitable for the PG-13 rule, but don’t make things TOO easy on yourself. Your comic does not necessarily have to make sense (you only have one page, after all), but challenge yourself to make a faithful comic reproduction of what’s happening on that page.
**For kicks, include the title, author and page number of the book you’re using!**
Quick Rules Recap: 
01. Submissions must be 1 page or less, and please try to limit pages to 2000px tall or less.
02. Submissions must relate to the current week’s challenge.
03. Submissions must be suitable for PG-13 audiences (see here for more info on this.)
04. All submissions must be made specifically for this challenge.
Please use the submit feature to post your comic when you’re done!
Questions? Read the FAQ and other info on the left side of the blog. Or send me an ask if you need to and I’ll be happy to let you in on the comix secrets.

Taking it on this week!

comixwarriors:

Comix Warriors Week #20:  Make a Comic from a Random Book Page

Submissions open from 02/12/14 - 02/18/14, due at 11:59pm EST. Not sure of the time? Check the countdown timer on the blog’s main page!

A challenge emerges! DUN DUN DUNNNN This week, you’re asked to grab a random book, turn to a random page, and make a comic out of it! You can choose another random page if the first one is just a total bore or is unsuitable for the PG-13 rule, but don’t make things TOO easy on yourself. Your comic does not necessarily have to make sense (you only have one page, after all), but challenge yourself to make a faithful comic reproduction of what’s happening on that page.

**For kicks, include the title, author and page number of the book you’re using!**

Quick Rules Recap: 

01. Submissions must be 1 page or less, and please try to limit pages to 2000px tall or less.

02. Submissions must relate to the current week’s challenge.

03. Submissions must be suitable for PG-13 audiences (see here for more info on this.)

04. All submissions must be made specifically for this challenge.

Please use the submit feature to post your comic when you’re done!

Questions? Read the FAQ and other info on the left side of the blog. Or send me an ask if you need to and I’ll be happy to let you in on the comix secrets.

Taking it on this week!


geniusandexcellence:

nock-nock-nock:

Moomin

Tove Jansson.

(via spx)








I know its late, but after the continuously losing battle with my used scanner I had to get creative and take pictures with my phone. Not the best quality but I wanted to share my comics, dammit! the rest will be out by the hour :)

I know its late, but after the continuously losing battle with my used scanner I had to get creative and take pictures with my phone. Not the best quality but I wanted to share my comics, dammit!

the rest will be out by the hour :)


thesweetmachine:

Long weekend.

thesweetmachine:

Long weekend.